Proud day for Wigan as the fairy tale rolls into Wembley

Posted by Tony Brown

 Wigan Athletic's team for their debut match in 1932 against Port Vale Reserves. Photo courtesy of Ron Hunt and WiganWorld.

* This post was co-written by Tony and Ned Brown -- father and son writing team -- from the perspective of Tony, the father.

My father loved Wigan Athletic Football Club. Hardly a minute would go by after the final whistle before he would launch into talk about the next match. Conversations - and in some cases, monologues -- about lineups, tactics and referees were a feature of my life as long as I can remember.

His love affair with the Latics began the year the club was formed in 1932, and never wavered until his passing in 2005. His devotion to such a modest club was difficult for others to understand in a region saturated with prestigious football clubs such as Manchester United, Manchester City, Liverpool and Everton. It was especially difficult to understand for the rugby fans in the area.

But my dad wasn't too perturbed by that. In his 73 years as a supporter, he witnessed the transition from non-league to Division 4, all the way up to the Championship, or second division as it was known for most of his time. Wigan were second in the Championship under the leadership of Paul Jewell, propelled by the dazzling strike partnership of Nathan Ellington and Jason Roberts, when he passed away. The Latics were promoted to the Premier League four months later. They have remained there ever since.

Were you to tell my father that his Wigan Athletic would go on to spend eight consecutive years in the Premier League and reach both the League Cup and FA Cup finals during that period, he almost certainly would not have believed you. He would have beamed with pride.

Neither Ned nor I were at that very first Wigan Athletic match against Port Vale Reserves back in 1932, but we each remember our first Latics experience and know the previous history thanks to my dad. We know where the club came from, and we know we are living the Wigan Athletic dream.

No matter what the result is on Cup Final Saturday, or the outcome of the relegation fight in the Premier League, Wigan Athletic have confounded people with their achievements. The club has come farther than any of us imagined in our wildest dreams, and their achievements will leave an indelible memory.

What's more, the work that Roberto Martinez has done in his return as manager of the club has been transformative. Rather than playing the role of the little fish up for a Premier League cameo, his plan has been one of consolidation.

While Steve Bruce did a job in keeping the club in the top flight, the money he spent on players and their wages was hardly sustainable if Latics were to suffer a bad season and go down. There was no investment in youth development or infrastructure.

Martinez's work to cut operating budgets and sell the top players in order to fund long-term growth sets up the club to survive for years to come. Sure, relegation is a threat each year and is to many clubs with more money, more fans and so on, but the club and its support are rapidly growing behind the scenes with every year that passes.

It is somewhat fitting, then, that Wigan's rival in the final is Manchester City -- not only a club with massive support, but also the beneficiary of the largest cash injection in world football thanks to their billionaire owner. In comparison with Wigan Athletic and Manchester City, even David and Goliath seem evenly matched!

Only a deluded romantic would expect a Wigan Athletic squad depleted by injury, mentally worn down, in the middle of the most intense Premier League survival fight to date, to beat Manchester City on Saturday. But if the club's history is anything to go by, the seemingly impossible can happen. The supporters of this club believe anything is possible because they are continuing to live it.

The Wigan Athletic story is far from over. Three matches in less than 10 days will determine whether the 2012-2013 season goes down in history as the year Wigan conquered the FA Cup, or survived for a ninth consecutive Premier League season against all odds.

But even if neither materialises, we could not be more proud of our club, which takes pride in doing things in a sensible way and never gives up.

Just to be in the FA Cup final, with the guarantee of Europa League football next season, boggles the mind. A win Saturday would just be icing on the cake.

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